December 09, 2016

GIVE UP TO MOVE UP


"All changes, even the most longed for, have their melancholy for what we leave behind us is a part of ourselves. We must die to one life before we can enter another."

Anatole France, late 19th/early 20th century French poet/journalist/novelist.

More often than not doors must close before new ones can open.

What is must cease to be to make room for what will be.

Make certain what you want is worthy of replacing what you have.

Then, when you are certain, work hard, plan and execute your plan, move on to a new and hopefully better future.

December 08, 2016

STRONG TEMPTATION


"We gain the strength of the temptation we resist."

Ralph Waldo Emerson, 19th century American essayist/lecturer/poet.

(You think this pup would agree?)

Temptation comes in many forms and is generally attributable to things not good for us.

(Did you ever hear of anyone resisting the temptation to eat broccoli?)

I'm not certain I've ever gained strength from resisting something I knew I really shouldn't have, but I do know I've later felt better when I did, with the reverse true when I didn't.

December 07, 2016

WELL LET ME TELL YOU A THING OR TWO!


"Before God we are all equally wise - and equally foolish."

Albert Einstein, 20th century German-born theoretical physicist.

Always good to remember, particularly the next time you decide you must answer some other fool's social media comment with which you don't agree.

Emphasis on "other" intended.

December 06, 2016

WHAT IT IS, NOT WHOSE FAULT IT IS


"It is wise to direct your anger towards problems - not people; to focus your energies on answers - not excuses."

William Arthur Ward, 20th century American writer.

While easy to get angry with the person(s) you believe caused the problem, that's just a distraction.

Identify the issue(s) that need correction and move on to the solution. 

If that involves people, so be it, but don't start with that or end with assigning blame.

That's not a solution.

December 05, 2016

THIS IS US


"I claim that human mind or human society is not divided into watertight compartments called social, political and religious. All act and react upon one another."

Mahatma Gandhi, late 19th/early 20th century leader of Indian independence.

You can think of yourself as not being political, religious, business oriented; in short, anyway you believe others define themselves you don't want defining you.

You could but you would be wrong doing so.

The "compartments" Gandhi refers to are not only not watertight, they don't exist.

We are all, all of this and more and you ignore the impact of what that is on your own life to your own detriment.